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COVID 19

Germany announces that travelers will be tested for virus on entry.

Adam Layaan Kurik Riza

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Germany declared on Tuesday that it will start testing visitors entering the country for the coronavirus in an effort to curb its spread.

 According to Deutsche Welle, the country’s Health Ministry said that all travelers, even those from low-risk areas, will undergo mandatory testing. The ministry is reportedly seeking “an expansion of test requirements upon entry as quickly as possible,” the outlet reported.

Sources say that air travelers entering Germany at this time are required to provide a negative coronavirus test or proof of their vaccination against the virus only if they are coming from high-risk areas.

The new move comes as Germany aims to take down the rise of delta variant infections. Health ministry officials have not yet made it clear as to whether or not the newly proposed testing requirements will apply to fully vaccinated individuals.

“The coordination in the government on this is underway,” a Health Ministry spokesperson told Reuters. Germany has reported more than 3.7 million coronavirus cases and more than 91,000 related deaths since the start of the pandemic, according to Johns Hopkins.

 

COVID 19

The removal of Maldives from the red list, increases the demand of British tourists

Adam Layaan Kurik Riza

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Since the Maldives was removed from the UK’s red list, demand from UK visitors has surged. According to UK media, travel websites in the country have seen a spike in traffic following the adjustments they made to their travel list on Friday. That day, the Maldives was moved from the red list to the amber list. According to reports, the majority of individuals wish to visit the Maldives, as well as Sri Lanka and Mexico.

Sky Scanner, one of the largest travel websites in the UK, reported a 95 percent surge in visitor demand last week. This increase is thought to be the result of the UK changing its COVID regulations to give permission for fully vaccinated people to move without having to have a PCR test. Another difference is that returning to the UK from an amber list country now simply requires quarantining at home rather than in a hotel.

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COVID 19

Vaccines donated by China arrive in Kenya as the pandemic struggle intensifies

Adam Layaan Kurik Riza

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Senior Kenyan government officials received a batch of Sinopharm COVID-19 vaccine doses from China on Saturday as the East African nation speeds up inoculations for high-risk populations against the virus, saying they will re-energize the country’s pandemic fight.

“The vaccines we are receiving today are testament to our two countries’ cordial relations, which extend beyond health care to include trade and other sectors of development,” said Susan Mochache, principal secretary of the Ministry of Health, who was among the officials who welcomed the arrival of the vaccine doses donated by China at Nairobi’s main airport.

Kenya’s pharmaceutical regulatory body has already approved China’s Sinopharm vaccine, as well as vaccines manufactured by Moderna, Johnson&Johnson, Pfizer, and AstraZeneca, as the government speeds up its immunization program.

According to Mochache, the receipt of the Sinopharm vaccine is a huge step forward in Kenya’s efforts to limit the pandemic and speed up the return to normalcy.

The two-dose Sinopharm vaccine, which can be delivered at 28-day intervals and stored at temperatures ranging from 2 to 8 degrees Celsius, is ideal for Kenya’s cold chain capability, according to Mochache.

The vaccination donation, according to Zhang Yijun, minister counselor at the Chinese Embassy in Kenya, underscores the vitality of bilateral cooperation between Nairobi and Beijing.

The vaccines that have come and are on their way “are a monument to our two countries’ comprehensive strategic cooperative collaboration and the profound traditional affection between our two peoples,” according to Zhang.

China has provided Kenya with ventilators, face masks, and personal protective equipment, as well as knowledge about pandemic control and prevention.

Kenyan health officials have previously voiced trust in China’s Sinopharm vaccine, claiming that wider availability will aid in the suppression of the coronavirus, ease the burden on the public health system, and support economic recovery.

Willis Akhwale, chair of the Ministry of Health’s COVID-19 vaccination task team, stated that Sinopharm’s approval by his country’s drug regulatory agency was a statement of confidence in its efficacy.

The Chinese vaccinations have also been deployed in Rwanda, where 200,000 Sinopharm doses were sent on August 19, and Zimbabwe, where a batch of Sinovac vaccine doses ordered from China on July 8 was delivered.

The Sinovac vaccine was licensed for use by South Africa’s Health Products Regulatory Authority on July 3, with state officials, labor unions, and political and civil society leaders expressing confidence in its efficacy.

Source: Xinhua News Agency

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COVID 19

Booster shots are being proposed as the United States fights COVID-19 with a vaccine regimen

Adam Layaan Kurik Riza

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A booster shot for COVID-19 immunization was considered in the United States on Friday, as the pandemic continues to spread, albeit some states, such as California, are actually doing better than in recent weeks.

According to The New York Times (NYT), the seven-day average of verified pandemic cases stood at 150,366 nationwide on Thursday, with the 14-day change representing a 9% decrease. On Thursday, there were 1,969 COVID-19-related deaths, representing a 29% increase over the previous 14 days.

New coronavirus cases and COVID-infected people According to the New York Times, 19 hospitalizations in the United States have begun to drop, though they remain significantly higher than earlier in the summer, and the number of new deaths continues to rise.

As the Delta variety has ravaged unvaccinated neighborhoods, the number of new deaths has risen to more than 1,900 every day, an increase of nearly 30 percent in the last two weeks. According to the report, almost one in every 500 Americans has died as a result of the sickness.

The federal data shows that the rate of immunizations remained rather slow, with 64 percent of eligible people in the United States fully immunized. According to health officials, the majority of patients who are hospitalized and dying are not vaccinated, whereas communities with greater rates of immunization have generally fared better, according to the article.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, California’s viral transmission declined from “high” to “substantial” earlier this week (CDC). It later recovered, although the total number of new cases per 100,000 population remained lower than in any other state.

“A vigorous push for immunizations, coupled with local mask laws and a public mostly ready to go along with them, appear to have helped flatten the state’s curve,” experts told The Washington Post (WP) on Friday.

“In comparison to many other states in the country, California made swift efforts to assess the scale of the problem and to deploy more COVID-19 control measures,” Robert Kim-Farley, an infectious disease expert at UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, told WP. “I believe that if California had not taken these measures to reduce transmission, we could have ended up with substantially greater levels.”

The Golden State’s change in CDC designation, a measure of how well states are doing in combatting the virus, was lauded by public health professionals, who suggested it was an indication that the state was nearing a tipping point. According to the study, “the struggle against Delta is far from done in California, which still faces a slew of hurdles in containing cases.”

The US government’s quest to make COVID-19 vaccination boosters widely available was put to the test on Friday when a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory council gathered to examine evidence on the extra injections, a matter that has divided federal health experts.

An outside team of around 20 scientific advisers analyzed data on the Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE vaccine’s decreased COVID-19 protection over time, as well as how people tolerated further doses.

Pfizer has sought regulators to approve booster shots for anyone aged 16 and up, and the FDA stated this week that all doses approved for use in the country are still effective without boosters.

While US health officials, certain other countries, and vaccine manufacturers have stated that boosters are required, many scientists, including some inside the FDA and the CDC, disagree.

The FDA panel subsequently agreed to recommend COVID-19 vaccine booster shots for Americans 65 and older, as well as those at high risk of serious illness, but rejecting the use of booster shots in general.

“Anything less than a full-throated endorsement could complicate the (US President Joe) Biden administration’s plan to begin distributing extra shots next week to boost immunity among the vaccinated and counter highly transmissible variants of the virus such as Delta,” The Wall Street Journal reported on Friday.

 

Source: Xinhua News Agency

 

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